Unlawful Rendition

Thank you for contacting me about allegations of UK involvement in unlawful rendition.

Unfortunately, due to other parliamentary commitments, I was unable to attend the debate on 29th June. However, I believe it is right that such an important issue was discussed in the House of Commons and I will continue to follow any developments closely.

The UK opposes any form of deprivation of liberty that amounts to placing a detained person outside the protection of the law, including so-called extraordinary rendition. The Government does not participate in, solicit, encourage or condone the use of torture for any purpose, and has made that position absolutely clear, both publicly and bilaterally with overseas partners. It remains committed to ensuring that allegations of UK complicity in unlawful rendition and mistreatment overseas are examined fully.

You may be aware that an inquiry into the role of the UK Government and security and intelligence agencies in relation to detainee treatment and rendition is currently being conducted by the Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament (ISC). Following the announcement by the CPS that there was insufficient evidence to prosecute the suspect in the case relating to the Belhadj and Al Saadi families, the ISC confirmed it will examine the case as part of its inquiry.

Given the ongoing civil case being pursued by Mr Belhadj, and the ISC inquiry it would be inappropriate to comment any further. Once the ISC has published its report, the Government will be able to consider whether a new judge-led inquiry is in the country's best interests.

Thank you again for taking the time to contact me.